Transformational Mayor’s Design Winners

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Transformational 2016 Mayor’s Design Awards winners unveiled.

17 transformational winners announced.

Winners were an eclectic mix.

Transformational

Freight Residences was one of the winners of the 2016 Mayor’s Design Awards. It was one of many transformational developments lauded.

Transformational.

Transformational was the common thread woven among the eclectic winners of the 2016 Mayor’s Design Awards.

The 17 transformational projects lauded Thursday night included two private homes, apartment communities, a brewery , hotels and other architecturally and place-making significant structures that contributes to the urban fabric of Denver.

“The theme that emerged from this year’s field of winners is transformation,” Mayor Michael B. Hancock said.

“The impact that these projects have made on their streets, their neighborhoods, and the city will be felt for years to come.,” Hancock continued.

Denver can be proud of this year’s crop of winners, according to the mayor.

“The owners and their project teams have shown a clear commitment to design with intention, with results that we can all take pride in,” Hancock said.

Since 2005, the awards have been presented to Denver homeowners, business owners, nonprofits, artists and others for their creative contributions to the public realm through innovative design.

Winners can range from community place-making projects to adaptive reuse of historic structures to single-family residences to major mixed-use downtown buildings. Each brings something special to Denver’s unique visual fabric and speaks to our collective commitment to building healthy, sustainable communities.

The 2016 Mayor’s Design Award winners, photos of the transformational projects (courtesy of Denver Planning and Community Development) and a description by the judges who selected them, include:

 

  • Freight Residences, 3515 Ringsby Court
Transormational

Freight Residences.

  • Category: Density by Design
  • Property owner: Zeppelin Development
  • Architect: Dynia Architects
  • Builder: Brinkmann Constructors

Judge’s comments.

This 48-unit multi-family rental project, located within the 25-acre TAXI mixed-use community in River North, bucked the trend of urban one-bedroom and studio apartments. The 2- and 3-bedroom floorplans were designed with families’ needs in mind and represent a targeted, niche product for families that have been priced out of the for-sale market or have been turned off by millennial-focused apartment buildings. The look of the development pays homage to the industrial history and feel of River North, while its amenities create a neighborhood ambiance in this emerging area of the city.

 

  • One City Block, 444 E. 19th Ave.
Transformational

One City Block

  • Category: Density by Design
  • Owner: RedPeak
  • Architect: Davis Partnership
  • Builder: Saunders Construction Inc.

Judge’s Comments

The block between 18th and 19th Avenues at Pennsylvania and Logan Streets, only recently a bleak island of underutilized asphalt parking, is now a welcoming, integrated multifamily development with roots in the historical fabric of the Uptown neighborhood. The design carefully positions four structures, each with its own architectural character, so they address the surrounding streets in a formal, urban manner. The streetscape edges of the site were developed to engage the pedestrian and to reduce the impact of vehicular traffic that circulates around the property. One City Block is a bellwether project, setting a higher standard for design and development in one of Denver’s oldest and most beloved neighborhoods.

  • Blue Moon Brewing Co. – RiNo District, 3750 Chestnut Place
Transformational

Blue Moon Brewery

  • Category: Distinctive Denver
  • Owner: Menalto Development, LLC, Blue Moon Brewing Company – RiNo District
  • Architect: Roth Sheppard Architects
  • Builder: Hyder Construction

Judge’s Comments

This repurposed warehouse is yet another new bright spot in the thriving River North neighborhood. Located just about two miles north of Blue Moon’s 1995 birthplace in the basement of the Sandlot at Coors Field, the brewery is the realization of a vision to create a space where consumers could sample beers that showcase the creativity of the brewery. Despite its growth into a national brand, Blue Moon remains a local favorite, and the building and its welcoming design are reflections of the brewery’s popularity and the importance of its local roots.

  • The Metlo, 1111 Broadway
Transformational

Metlo

  • Category: Distinctive Denver
  • Owners: Mark Rycroft & Dominique G. Cook-Rycroft
  • Builders: Jon C. Cook & Mark Rycroft

Judge’s Comments

Situated along a busy stretch of Broadway, the Metlo brings together mid-century charm and 21st Century professional work space sensibility. From the original use as a motel emerged an office building unlike any seen in Denver, brought about by a vision to restore the building’s original shine. Housing a wide range of businesses and retailers, the building, its tenants and its visitors now make this a busy and vibrant corner of Broadway and the Golden Triangle neighborhood. The transformation has given the structure new life while retaining its character and keeping alive a historical piece of Broadway’s landscape.

  • Torchy’s Tacos, 1085 Broadway
Transformational

Torchys Tacos

  • Category: Neighborhood Gem
  • Owner: The Bailey Company, LLP
  • Architect: Chioco Design

Judge’s Comments

With this renovation of a former Arby’s, the owners sought to create a striking and contemporary identity for the Torchy’s Tacos brand that used much of the design vocabulary established over several years and multiple locations. A renovation of this magnitude offered the opportunity to transform the existing structure with new architectural elements, and resulted in an eatery that feels like a local joint, rather than a national chain. The building is not only more visually appealing, but also provides a more approachable storefront for pedestrians and bicyclists, making it a true neighborhood destination.

  • Galaxie, 3520 E. Colfax Ave.
Transformational

Galaxie

 

  • Category: Neighborhood Gem
  • Owner: Rosen Properties
  • Architect: Laura Koheler, CTA Architects Engineers
  • Builder: Spectrum

Judge’s Comments

This project feels like the Colfax Avenue of Denver’s present and future. It was built with the goal of reactivating this former auto body shop into a functional retail space that would serve the local community and reflect the character and vibrancy of the surrounding neighborhood. The building and its new tenants have helped to reinvigorate an underutilized space from the early automobile age, demonstrating that Colfax is ready to become a place where people stop and enjoy themselves rather than just pass by. Aspirations included providing amenities to an increasingly active and walkable community, returning space from the automobile to the people, and creating a place where people park their strollers rather than their cars.

  • The ART, a hotel, 1201 Broadway
Transformational

The Art, a hotel

  • Category: Distinctive Denver
  • Owner: The ART, LLC. Corporex Colorado and Mile High Development
  • Architect: Davis Partnership, Brit Probst
  • Builder: Haselden Construction, Byron Haselden

Judge’s Comments

Nested among established icons in Denver’s cultural life and landscape, this building is one of the Golden Triangle’s newest gems. Making great use of a very odd-shaped lot, the hotel is visually stunning and a mixed-use marvel. Guests experience art in the true Colorado environment: open, airy, bathed with natural light and always connected to our beautiful weather and incredible blue skies. The outdoor rooftop deck is the hotel’s cornerstone, representing its true connection to Colorado culture and our love of the outdoors. Paired with the History Colorado Center across the street, the building creates a wonderful gateway into downtown from South Broadway.

  • Private residence, 2510 S. Lowell Boulevard
Transformatioinal

Private home, 2510 S. Lowell Boulevard.

  • Category: This Is Home
  • Original Architects: Cliff May and Chris Chote
  • Designer: Adrian Kinney
  • Builder: Burns Realty

Judge’s Comments

This renovation of a 1955 Cliff May home sought to modernize the house with the conveniences of today while keeping the flavor of Cliff May’s Mid-Century Modern style. The project included the removal of a six-foot fence that previously hid the home from the street. The result is a much more inviting street presence that retains a measure of privacy for the occupants while allowing the design to shine as the neighborhood bright spot it is. In addition, the home was outfitted with “smart” features to add the same futuristic flair it had when originally built.

  • Halcyon, 245 Columbine St.

 

Transformational

Halycon

  • Category: Neighborhood Gem
  • Owner: BMC Investments, in partnership with Sage Hospitality
  • Architect: JNS Design
  • Builder: Mortenson

Judge’s Comments

The first hotel to open in Cherry Creek in more than a decade, this building took the site of an old post office that was a common target for vandalism and considered an eyesore by neighborhood residents. Along with offering new dining and entertainment, the hotel is a showcase of local art, with traditional and modern art pieces featuring solely local artists, and galleries that accentuate the unique character that Cherry Creek and Denver have to offer. The Gear Garage is a true novelty, encouraging guests to use the neighborhood parks and trails, offering complimentary skateboards, Vespa scooters and electronic bikes. The site helps create pedestrian traffic for the surrounding shops, boutiques and cafes, and is now a true reflection of the neighborhood’s contemporary, urbane features

  • Private residence, 4025 Grove St.

 

Transformational

Private home, 4025 Grove St.

  • Category: Hidden Gem
  • Owners: Sara Avery and Jason Schroeder
  • Architect: Kevin Anderson, ArcWest Architects
  • Interior Designer: Katie Schroder, Atelier Interior Design
  • Builder: Tim Saul, Saul Construction

Judge’s Comments

This craftsman bungalow in the Highland neighborhood brought back to life a structure that might have been demolished due to mold problems. Heavy timbers accentuate the original blond and red brick along with the forest green trim and tapered columns, while the upstairs balcony adds interest to the original roof lines. Existing stained glass doors were kept to help maintain the character of the house, along with some original brick in the interior, creating a space that is harmonious with the craftsman style of the exterior. This home is a perfect mix of old and new while keeping the integrity of the original structure and feel of the neighborhood.

  • Bindery on Blake, 2901 & 2875 Blake St.
Transformational

Bindery

  • Category: Back to the Future
  • Property owner: Danielsen Investments, LLC
  • Architect: Oz Architecture
  • Builder: Sprung Construction

Judge’s Comments

This almost 100-year-old building has been in the same family since 1976, originally housing its commercial printing business. The printing company vacated the property in 2014, creating the perfect opportunity to give new life to the building. Embarking on what they called “a heart-lung-liver transplant,” the owners sought to preserve the structure, including foot-wide brick walls and clerestory windows, while transforming it to support creative business and the artistic community that gives the River North neighborhood its unique identity through studios leased at discounted rates. The building has carried forward the best of what it was while welcoming the businesses people want and need in a thriving neighborhood.

 

  • Denizen, 415 South Cherokee St.
Transformational

Denizen

  • Category: Distinctive Denver
  • Owner: D4 Urban
  • Architect: KEPHART community :: planning :: architecture
  • Builders: PCL Construction and CFC Construction

Judge’s Comments

A literal stone’s throw away from RTD’s Alameda Station, this development emerged from a vision to create a benchmark community that would pave the way for future development in the Denver Design District and set a standard for transit-oriented development in Denver. The buildings thoughtfully embrace Cherokee and Dakota Streets, along with the transit platform, to act as a gateway that connects the Baker neighborhood with Alameda Station. The result of partnerships among numerous private and public entities, this LEED-Platinum-certified development exemplifies Denver’s collaborative ethos, transforms a transit station into a place to be and extends the reach of an historic neighborhood.

  • Wheels Go Round, 16th Street Mall
Transformational

Wheels Go Ground

  • Owner: Kate Davis, Kate Davis Studio
  • Architect/Designer: Campbell Brown
  • Builder: Aqua Padick

Judge’s Comments

This temporary installation was created for Meet in Street’s Prototyping Festival, a collaboration between the City of Denver and the Downtown Denver Partnership to place interactive structures along the 16th Street Mall to activate the space in different ways. The 20-foot line of colorful bicycle wheels, which made different sounds as they were spun, was originally meant to be in place for 10 days. Because of its popularity, the interactive sculpture stayed up for a month and consistently drew crowds, both adults and children, to “play,” successfully changing how people felt and used the block between Stout and Champa Streets.

  • Mental Health Center of Denver’s Dahlia Campus for Health and Well-Being, 3401 Eudora St.
Transormational

Mental Health Center

  • Category: Building Well, Living Well
  • Owner: Mental Health Center of Denver
  • Architect: Anderson Mason Dale Architects
  • Builder: Taylor Kohrs

Judge’s Comments

This full-block development is the result of a strong partnership between the Mental Health Center of Denver and the Northeast Park Hill community, which shared its ideas about well-being, health, education, food access, access to dental care, and mental health over the last three years. Building on the strengths of the community and informed by natural community leaders, the campus offers a comprehensive array of services focused on what neighbors need, serving as the nation’s first mental health center to be built with the intention of supporting all aspects of well-being. The facility and surrounding garden provide a safe gathering place for the community and a transformational asset to the neighborhood that will uplift the area for years to come.

  • Denver Art Museum Administration Building, 1226 Bannock St.
Transformational

Denver Art Museum Administration Building

  • Category: Distinctive Denver
  • Owner: Denver Art Museum
  • Architect: Roth Sheppard Architects
  • Builder: Saunders Construction Inc.

Judge’s Comments

Intended to promote efficiency and collaboration among museum staff previously housed five blocks away, this building complements neighboring structures along Bannock Street with its stature. Along with more than 100 museum employees, including administrators, curators and others, the structure also houses a research library and 9,000 square feet of collection storage, the creation of which helped to reopen space inside the museum’s North Building for public programs and exhibitions. Built with funds raised privately from museum supporters and trustees, the building is a welcome addition to the neighborhood, further enhancing an already architecture-rich corner of Denver’s Golden Triangle.

  • Room & Board, Cherry Creek, 222 Detroit St.
Transformational

Room & Board

  • Category: Distinctive Denver
  • Owner: ALMJ Properties/Room & Board
  • Architect: Roth Sheppard Architects
  • Builder: Hyder Construction

Judge’s Comments

This renovation was meant to provide customers a more modern environment to shop, reflect the company’s brand, and offer a larger selection while keeping the store in the same Cherry Creek North location it is has called home for 25 years. The wall-to-wall street-level display windows create a more active, inviting street presence in line with the surrounding active storefronts and speak to the walkable nature of the neighborhood. In addition, the 6,000-square-foot rooftop patio, which reflects Denver’s outdoor living culture, showcases the store’s entire outdoor furniture collection and serves as a community gathering space for special events.

 

  • Regency Athletic Complex, 1600 W. Colfax Ave.
Transformational

Regency Athletic Field

  • Category: Sustainable Style
  • Owner: Metropolitan State University of Denver
  • Architect: Davis Partnership
  • Builder: Saunders Construction Inc.

Judge’s Comments

This 13.5-acre multi-use sports complex, south of the Auraria Campus in downtown Denver, sought to consolidate MSU Denver’s Division II outdoor athletics programs to one location. The complex repurposes a previously blighted, urban industrial site into an active space that enhances opportunities for athletes while encouraging interaction between the school and local community. It houses a relocated baseball field, soccer field, softball field, and eight tennis courts, as well as press boxes, concessions, and locker and training rooms. The complex welcomes community users and provides an attractive and functional place for tournaments, community events and gatherings, transforming an unusable area into a beacon of energy and prosperity.

Have a story idea or real estate tip? Contact John Rebchook at JRCHOOK@gmail.com. DenverRealEstateWatch.com is sponsored by 8z Real Estate. To read more articles by John Rebchook, subscribe to the Colorado Real Estate Journal.

 

 

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John Rebchook

John Rebchook has more than 30 years of experience in writing and communications. As the Real Estate Editor for the Rocky Mountain News, he wrote about residential and commercial real estate for 26 years. He has won numerous awards for business stories and columns that he wrote, both as an individual and part of teams. In addition to real estate, he also covered economic development, banking and financing, the airlines, and cable TV for the Rocky. In addition, he was one of the original freelance writers for GlobeSt.com, covering commercial real estate for the Internet publication.

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